The Moral Of Life From The Sociological Prospect In The Texts Of The Ramayana And Gilgamesh: [Essay Example], 747 words GradesFixer
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The Moral of Life from the Sociological Prospect in the Texts of the Ramayana and Gilgamesh

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Moral values are known to be the right or wrong ways that a person perceives life. They affect the paths and choices you make, and ultimately your life depends on them, considering you grow up believing in them. Losing someone can awaken your morals, or eventually make you lose sight of what you used to believe in. In the texts of the Ramayana and Gilgamesh, the moral of life was awakened in relation to the Sociological Prospect. The Sociological Prospect, as stated by Campbell is that it is known to be “the validation and maintenance of an established order.” It can also be wisdom and be an embodiment of morals that eventually teach us how to behave and live life.

In the Ramayana, Rama believed people’s words and did not believe in Sita and her devotion towards him. He felt victim to people’s nay-say which claimed that Sita was impure because of how long she had stayed with Ravana. However, she later proved them all long. When Sita’s and Rama’s sons, Lava and Kusha, found Rama and his kingdom, it eventually led Sita back to Rama. He learned that she was faithful after all after seeing that she was the twins’ mother, but it was also confirmed after she dropped into the Earth that she was never unfaithful to him. Losing his wife and failing to see his children grow up most likely awakened a moral of Rama’s. The moral would probably be that you shouldn’t be so careless to fall into people’s words. Strangers don’t know your family better than you. In the sense of the Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh lost his best friend Enkidu to the hands of the Gods. He kept challenging the Gods by slaughtering anything considered sacred to them, and so eventually both men faced the Gods’ wrath. They chose one to die, and the other to learn a valuable lesson from the death. Fear was instigated in Gilgamesh from the Gods, but a moral was also learned. Gilgamesh should not challenge authority that he has no right to be going against.

Besides both men losing their loved ones, they can be remembered for the love they offered to the others. Gilgamesh and Rama both had gone on a journey, for their own purposes, however, someone had accompanied both of them along the way. In a way, the people who had accompanied them had also built their character to how we can view it now. Rama went on his journey with both Lakshmana and his wife Sita to destroy the evil of Ravana. He became more motivated on his journey and continued to build his dharma once his wife was kidnapped. Anything that he would do would be because of her and her safety. Similarly, Gilgamesh went on a journey with someone who filled the void in his life like Lakshmana and Sita did to Rama. Enkidu became Gilgamesh’s best friend and gave him a purpose and way to build his character. He was no longer just the cruel tyrant that everyone hated. Out of this, both characters grew as a whole and learned the moral values of companionship and love.

There is some sort of similarity in the divine prospect both stories portray, but yet a vast difference in the motives. Rama is already divine, considering he was an incarnate of Vishnu, yet relies on the Gods to help guide him through his path to defeat Ravana. He gets what he wants because he completes his Dharma to his wife and the Gods. On the other hand, Gilgamesh was proclaimed to having been born of the Gods, yet when you read the story, there is almost no divine aura you can grasp of his. Yes, he defeated many of the Gods’ sacred obstacles, but he didn’t do it for good. He even brought famine upon his kingdom. Rama never looked for immortality, despite being a human-like Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh however, looked to attain that prospect, and yet failed. Rama did things for the good of the world and received that goodness back in turn. With Gilgamesh it was the opposite, he expanded his kingdom, but exploited its people. He didn’t necessarily do any good if his own people prayed to the Gods to send something to deter him. And so, the moral that can be learned from both of these experiences is that do to others what you’d want to be done to you. And really, be kind to people, for what comes around, goes back around.

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The Moral Of Life From The Sociological Prospect In The Texts Of The Ramayana And Gilgamesh. (2019, August 08). GradesFixer. Retrieved October 30, 2020, from https://gradesfixer.com/free-essay-examples/the-moral-of-life-from-the-sociological-prospect-in-the-texts-of-the-ramayana-and-gilgamesh/
“The Moral Of Life From The Sociological Prospect In The Texts Of The Ramayana And Gilgamesh.” GradesFixer, 08 Aug. 2019, gradesfixer.com/free-essay-examples/the-moral-of-life-from-the-sociological-prospect-in-the-texts-of-the-ramayana-and-gilgamesh/
The Moral Of Life From The Sociological Prospect In The Texts Of The Ramayana And Gilgamesh. [online]. Available at: <https://gradesfixer.com/free-essay-examples/the-moral-of-life-from-the-sociological-prospect-in-the-texts-of-the-ramayana-and-gilgamesh/> [Accessed 30 Oct. 2020].
The Moral Of Life From The Sociological Prospect In The Texts Of The Ramayana And Gilgamesh [Internet]. GradesFixer. 2019 Aug 08 [cited 2020 Oct 30]. Available from: https://gradesfixer.com/free-essay-examples/the-moral-of-life-from-the-sociological-prospect-in-the-texts-of-the-ramayana-and-gilgamesh/
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