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What Happened at The Seneca Falls Convention

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What Happened at The Seneca Falls Convention essay
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The article describes the first woman’s rights convention in the United States, otherwise known as the Seneca Falls Convention. The convention was held at the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Seneca Falls on the 19 and 20 of July 1848. It was held on behalf of women’s social and political equality, their movement fed by the determination of the first women’s rights activists to find a solution to long-time sexism and gender inequality. Nearly three hundred people, both men, and women, attended the Seneca Falls Convention on the first day. By the second day, a bill entitled the Declaration of Sentiments was signed 100 people, stating their resolutions for inequality.

In this article, The Seneca Falls Convention is explained and described. The Seneca Falls Convention was the first woman’s rights convention in the United States. The meeting was held in July 1848, in Seneca Falls, New York, to discuss and evaluate the women’s suffrage movement; overall, three hundred people attended the convention, with the first day being strictly for women. The topic of the convention was resolutions on women’s rights, which all went into law with the exception of the right to vote. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, both equal rights activists, were two of five women who organized the event.

In this article, Genevieve LeBaron describes why the women’s rights movement was so vital to equality, as well as explains what events caused the Convention in the first place. The Seneca Falls Convention was the first step that ultimately led to the major breakthroughs in women’s equality, such as the freedom to vote, and more equal opportunities the workplace. For the two days that the convention was held, three hundred people came to discuss the rights of women, specifically the right to vote. As women at the time had no political rights, their goal was to eliminate the vast injustices in what women were and were not allowed to do. Lucretia Coffin Mott, who lived from 1793 to 1880, was an American feminist and equality activist. After 1818, she became known for her inspirational teachings about peace and equality, especially the abolition of slavery. She helped runaway slaves, and after attending the meeting of the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833, she became one of the main organizers of the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society. Mott was led to her true calling, women’s rights, by the refusal made by the World Anti-Slavery Convention in London to acknowledge women as valid delegates. She, along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, organized the first woman’s rights convention ever held in the United States in 1848, at Seneca Falls, N.Y.Lucretia Mott was born in 1793, and she died in 1880. Mott fought against slavery and women’s equal rights for most of her life. For a short time Mott taught a small school in Philadelphia, and after that, she began to become more active in the church; in 1821 she became an official minister. Lucretia Mott helped found the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833, and in 1840, she went to London to attend a world anti-slavery conference. She began a campaign for women’s rights because of the conference, when it refused to seat women. It was in London where she met Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and together they planned a women’s rights convention. It was held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, N.Y. It launched the first woman suffrage movement in the United States.

The article talks about the first Woman’s Rights Convention held in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848 which was organized by five women including Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott. The first day of the meeting was to be for women only, but the convention organizers did not know how to ask men who were present to leave. In fact, the women asked a man, James Mott, to preside at the convention. Over the course of the two-day convention, members sat through several hours of debate. However, by the end of the second day, they had written and signed a document that voiced all of their thoughts.

The Seneca Falls Convention is better known as the first woman’s rights convention in the United States. It is a milestone in the history of equal rights. The convention was held at the Wesleyan Chapel in Seneca Falls, New York, on July 19 and 20, 1848. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, one of the organizers of the convention, drafted up the Declaration of Sentiments, a document describing the needs for women’s equal rights; it also described the issues women faced on a daily basis. Nearly all of the propositions in the declaration went into law, all except the right to vote, which was still a controversial debate at the time. However, 70 years later, the nineteenth amendment was passed, finally granting women the right they’d been fighting for so long ago.

The Seneca Falls Convention, the first woman’s rights convention in the United States, was held in Seneca Falls, New York in July of 1848. During the convention, a group of 300 men and women met to discuss the restrictions forced upon women at the time. Their awareness of those restrictions was brought into realization due to the anti-slavery movement and their involvement in it. Eventually, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote the Declaration of Sentiments, a document inspired by the Declaration of Independence. This document would become the foundation for all of the equal rights achievements thereafter.

The Seneca Falls Convention was held on July 19 and 20, 1848, at Seneca Falls, New York. It was the convention began the women’s rights movement in the United States. Elizabeth Cady Stanton lived in Seneca Falls, which is how she chose the location of the convention; she, along with Lucretia Mott and three others, organized the convention. During the convention, Stanton wrote the “Declaration of Sentiments”, a list of injustices and resolutions inspired by the Declaration of Independence. The convention passed twelve resolutions, eleven of them decided unanimously, that were created to gain certain equal rights that women had been denied. The only resolution the party could not agree on was the right to vote, which would eventually come to pass in the 19th amendment.

After holding the first woman’s rights convention held on July 19, 1848, at New York, suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton and other signers of the women’s rights declaration were laughed at by most people. Both Stanton’s husband and father attempted to pressure her to stop speaking in public. However, she continued to lead the campaign for equal rights for women in the U.S. for over fifty years. She also wrote many books and articles directed at bringing others to the national women’s group. Until her death in 1902, Elizabeth Stanton took part in the many petition drives that helped pass laws to amend the injustices in women’s rights.

The Seneca Falls Convention is an assembly that was held on July 19 and 20, 1848, at Seneca Falls, New York. Seneca Falls was the home of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who, along with Lucretia Mott, conceived and directed the convention. The two feminist leaders had been denied access from participating in the 1840 World Anti-Slavery Convention in London, an event that, although fighting against racism, still showed inequality to women trying to support their cause. At the 1848 convention Stanton read the “Declaration of Sentiments”, a statement of grievances and demands patterned closely after the Declaration of Independence. It called upon women to organize and to petition for their rights. The convention passed twelve resolutions, nearly all of them being voted through unanimously, that were created to give women certain equal rights that they had been denied. The only resolution the party could not agree on was the right to vote, which would eventually be decided as the 19th amendment.

This article states and explains the speech made by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who was one of the most famous advocates for women’s rights in the U.S. at the Woman’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York on July 19, 1848. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was the first American woman to publicly argue for the resolution of women’s suffrage. Stanton took a lead role in organizing the Seneca Falls Convention (also known as the first woman’s rights convention) in her hometown of Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848. Stanton also worked very closely with Susan B. Anthony, another of the advocate for American feminism, who often read speeches written by Stanton. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a leader in the women’s rights movement until her death in 1902.The Seneca Falls Convention occurred on July 19, 1848. Also known as the first woman’s rights convention, the event lasted for two days and was held in the Wesleyan Chapel External in Seneca Falls, New York. Approximately three hundred people attended the convention despite the fact that it had been barely advertised. Most of the attendees to the convention had been brought to the women’s suffrage movement by the fight to end slavery; in fact, all five of the women who organized the Seneca Falls Convention was also involved in the movement to end slavery. Elizabeth Cady Stanton drafted the “Declaration of Sentiments”, which was inspired by the Declaration of Independence, but instead of freedom from England, the goal of their document was to grant women freedom from the limitations to their rights.

This article describes woman’s suffrage throughout history. The women’s suffrage movement was the struggle for women to get the right of women to vote. It began in the early nineteenth century during the fight against slavery. At that time, women in several countries, specifically the United States, formed organizations to fight for women’s suffrage. Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton organized the first woman’s rights convention in 1848. Ironically, the right to vote was the only right the entire group could not agree on.

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What Happened at the Seneca Falls Convention. (2019, January 03). GradesFixer. Retrieved December 6, 2021, from https://gradesfixer.com/free-essay-examples/seneca-falls-convention/
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What Happened at the Seneca Falls Convention. [online]. Available at: <https://gradesfixer.com/free-essay-examples/seneca-falls-convention/> [Accessed 6 Dec. 2021].
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